Sunday, 16 November 2014

STONES




New Release: Stones: 
Coming-of-Middle-Age Fiction  

Stones is a humorous coming-of-middle-age women’s fiction about closure.

New Adult fiction seems to be all the rage these days. Well, I’m starting a trend of my own—Old Adult Fiction.  
Or more accurately, Coming-of-Middle-Age-Fiction. Stones features women of a certain age. Before being published by The Wild Rose Press, the manuscript, which finaled in the Georgia Romance Writers Unpublished Maggie Award for Excellence, was called The Colonoscopy Club. 
So you have an idea of what age I’m talking about.

In Stones, readers are introduced to the concept of closure in the very first paragraph.

“Thank God for LINT. It’s the one area in my life where I’ve been able to achieve closure. I can wash a load of towels, toss them into the dryer, fold them, and, after opening the lint filter, peel back a glorious, thick, colorful strip of lint, admire it, and throw it into the wastebasket. Then I can cross that task off my to-do list. Now, THAT is closure! And, by the way, I have a new dryer that gives really good lint.”



Back of the Book blurb:                            

When Julie Paver’s husband Matt moves his business to Atlanta, she is forced to leave behind her thriving jewelry boutique, Stones. The move threatens their twenty-five-year marriage, because now if Matt isn’t out of town negotiating a merger, he’s spending late hours on overseas phone calls with his sexy-sounding second-in-command. Feeling neglected and unloved, Julie seeks closure by reconnecting with her first love, Manny, when he pursues her with his Internet innuendos. Manny is unaware he’s the father of Julie’s son, and Julie contemplates revealing the secret to him on the eve of their son’s wedding. But would such a walk down memory lane be worth the cost? Julie and Manny finally meet at her oceanfront condo — in the midst of a hurricane — and elements collide to create the perfect storm in a coming-of-middle-age crisis.
 
Excerpt
To go or not to go to Palm Coast is no longer the question. The question is what will I do once I get there? Will I really have the nerve to reconnect, or as my daughter Natalie likes to say, “hook up,” again with Manny Gellar? How will I feel tomorrow when I see him alone for the first time after twenty-five years? Will I finally reveal what I feel compelled—no, what

I’m busting a gut—to tell him? That he has a beautiful son, that our son Josh is getting married in just three months? I’m probably rationalizing, but I think he finally has a right to know.



If I could, I’d fix what is wrong with my marriage and put it back the way it was before, as easily as Ricardo fixed my washing machine. Before Matt yanked me out of Miami by my roots as if I were a noxious weed he was tossing out of a flower garden and carelessly transplanted us to Atlanta.



Before we moved a state away from my family and my best friend and a business I’d worked a lifetime to create. Before Matt sold his freight-expediting business to a German conglomerate for mega-millions and agreed to run the company for them from Atlanta for the next two years, barely consulting me. Before the German occupation, or rather before he became preoccupied

with his sexy-sounding German second-in-command, Gretchen. Before he stopped sleeping with me in the biblical sense. Before I turned fifty.



All I really want is closure. I’m convinced that meeting Manny Gellar again is the only way I will ever come full circle and reconnect with my life.


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Romancing the “STONES” Novelist Interview:


What draws you as a ‘reader’ to the romance genre?
  
Reliving that feeling of “first love” and attraction, reading about how the couple overcomes obstacles and gets their happy ending.


What is the most difficult part of writing a love story? 

Building tension in the relationship.  I always want things to happen too quickly.


Is creating a book title easy for you? Tell us about the process. 

Coming up with the title is the first thing I do before I can even start writing the book. Anything can inspire me. I may overhear a word or a phrase and it triggers an idea. When a title pops into my head and I know it’s the right one, then I can begin. My background is Marketing and Public Relations so for me, writing a creative title is the easy part. That said, in my eighth book with The Wild Rose Press, which is under contract, the original title was “Murder on the Repositioning Cruise,” and I had to shorten it to Killer Cruise, because it was consistent with the other two-word titles in my psychic mystery series: Sixth Sense and Homecoming Homicides. And not everyone knew what a repositioning cruise was. But by the time I renamed it, I had already written the book. Other than that, all of my books retained their original names. One of my favorite titles is Murder at the Outlet Mall, a shopping suspense tale I co-wrote with my sister, a Florida artist in Ponte Vedra Beach.   



Do your characters love the direction you take for them or do they have other ideas?

The characters always have other ideas. And I usually go along with them. The characters will have complete conversations in my head and when that happens, I just listen and write it down.


Any tips for writers that you’d love to share?


Many people have said this, but it’s great advice: Finish the book. The best way to promote your book is to write another one.  Hang in there. Don’t give up on your dream to publish. You may be the last one standing, but eventually you will get published if you are persistent. Stones was some ten years in the making. And these days authors have so many paths to publication.


Marilyn will give away a PDF copy of Stones to one commenter.




Stones is available at the following sites:   

Amazon (Kindle and Paperback):


Barnes & Noble Nook:  



My Author Web site:




About Marilyn

Marilyn Baron is a public relations consultant in Atlanta, Georgia, and the author of humorous women’s fiction, historical romantic thrillers, a psychic suspense series, supernatural short stories and a musical. She has won or finaled in writing awards for Single Title, Suspense Romance, and Paranormal/Fantasy Romance and just finaled in the Georgia Romance Writers 2014 Published Maggie Award for Excellence in the Novel With Strong Romantic Elements category.



Marilyn has published six books with The Wild Rose Press (TWRP)

http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=advanced_search_result&search_in_description=1&keyword=marilyn%20baron&inc_subcat=0&sort=20a&page=1, She is under contract for two more books, The Widows’ Gallery, part of the new Lobster Cove series with TWRP, and Killer Cruise, A Psychic Crystal Mystery, Book Three. She has published four humorous paranormal short stories with TWB Press http://www.twbpress.com/authormarilynbaron.html and co-authored three books with her sister, award-winning Florida artist Sharon Goldman.



To find out more about Marilyn’s books, stories and upcoming releases, visit her Web site at www.marilynbaron.com. Visit her on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Marilyn-Baron/286807714666748 and follow her on Twitter at https://twitter.com/MarilynBaron.


19 comments:

  1. Thank you for featuring me on your blog today.

    Marilyn Baron

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  2. Enjoyed the interview! Your advice to keep writing is right on target. Not only will future readers have more books to choose from, but the continuous practice improves skill levels. Thanks and best wishes on all your book releases!

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  3. Ashantay, Thank you so much for commenting. I'm glad you enjoyed the interview. Every author says the same thing so it must be true. Keep writing! Thanks for the good wishes.
    Marilyn Baron

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  4. OMGoodness, I almost spewed my hot tea when I read the lint reference! It has now replaced the German occupation line as my favorite! Way to spin a phrase on its ear, Marilyn :) Stones just jumped to the top of my TBR list!

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  5. Debbie, thank you so much. it's my favorite of all the lines in my books and I've been waiting to use it. To me, peeling lint from a dryer is the only way to achieve closure in this world. That's really what the book is about. It's funny but at the same time discusses serious issues facing women of a certain age.

    Marilyn

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  6. Love the interview! Having just finished Stones, I can attest to what an awesome read it is. Excellent advice. Yes, finish the book, keep writing, that is the best way to assure success.

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  7. I have read and reviewed STONES and I must say this blog entices in all the right ways! Get STONES! Read it!

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  8. Alicia,
    Thanks for the comment and thank you for reading and reviewing Stones. I'm so glad you enjoyed it.
    Marilyn Baron

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  9. Susan, Thank you for commenting. I also appreciate you reading and reviewing Stones.
    Marilyn Baron

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  10. Great interview. Love your advice. So true about finishing the book then writing the next one. Mine usually overlap. While one is out for beta reading or editing, I start the next one. Loved Stones (as you know). I didn't realize you co-wrote Murder at the Outlet Mall. Hilarious story.

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  11. Diane,
    Thanks Diane. Yes, my sister Sharon and I collaborated on that book, The Edger, a humorous women's fiction and our musical about Alzheimer's called Memory Lane.
    Marilyn Baron

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  12. Oh, goodness! What great conflict in this story. I already don't like her husband. Sounds like a great book!

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  13. There is a lot of conflict in the story. Most people don't like the first boyfriend but they like the husband. Thanks for commenting.
    Marilyn

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  14. I can totally relate to wanting the couple to get together too quickly. I have to fight that tendency too.

    I love that paragraph about lint. I remember years ago, hearing an editor read that aloud in an open pitch workshop and requesting it. At the time, I didn't know that was your work. Kudos! Excellent humor. I think you should call this MA instead of NA for Mature Adult fiction.

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  15. Hi Carol. Yes, I remember that M&M conference. I like MA. Great idea. That's mostly what I write when I write women's fiction. Thanks for commenting.
    Marilyn

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  16. Thank you, Marilyn, for your generous spirit, encouragement and wonderful books.

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    1. Thanks, Terry.
      Marilyn

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  17. So great to have Marilyn on the blog. The interview was so much fun and full of great ideas. I love learning more about authors and the writing process. Hugs to all the commenters and best of luck in the draw for a PDF copy of STONES. :)

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  18. Thanks. I enjoyed it too and thank everyone for commenting. The winner of the PDF copy of Stones is Carol Burnside.

    Marilyn Baron

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